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COVID-19 Registration

COVID-19 Vaccinations

COVID-19 Vaccines Now Available in Tucson, AZ!

COVID-19 Vaccines Now Available in Tucson, AZ!

Priority Medical Group is now offering drive-up COVID-19 vaccines!

We currently only offer drive-up vaccinations at our Hartman location but are also ramping up on-site vaccinations for schools, care homes, assisted laving facilities, and corporate offices! Please give us a call at 520-689-6814 for more details.

Schedule Your COVID-19 Vaccination

Eligibility for COVID-19 vaccines and boosters has expanded. Make an appointment today. It’s safe, easy, and free.

Everyone age 5 and older is eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine.

Everyone age 18 and older, who completed an initial vaccine series, is eligible for a booster.

Parents/Guardians of people under age 18 without proxy will need to call to schedule an appointment. Individuals who are aged 5-17 can also schedule an appointment Parental consent is required if under 18 years old.

We continue to follow guidance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It is important to remember that vaccines are the best way to reduce infections and hospitalizations in the community.

Please see the list of locations below and instructions for scheduling. We are experiencing a high call volume, so we appreciate your patience. Please continue to visit this page for updates.

To learn more about other options for Vaccination, please read our FAQs below.

COVID-19 Vaccine FAQs

Everyone age 5 and older is eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine. Make an appointment at one of our sites below.
Parents/Guardians of people under age 18 without patient portal access will need to call to schedule an appointment. Individuals who are aged 5-17 can also schedule their vaccine by clicking on the PMG patient portal Parental consent is required if under 18 years old.

Everyone age 5 and older is eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine. Make an appointment at one of our sites below.
Parents/Guardians of people under age 18 without PMG patient portal access will need to call to schedule an appointment. Individuals who are aged 5-17 can also by clicking on the PMG patient portal, Parental consent is required if under 18 years old.

Many PMG patients may have access to vaccine through commercial pharmacies or county resources beyond those offered by Priority Medical Group. We encourage you to get vaccinated where convenient and in the most safe and timely manner possible.
You can also check https://www.vaccines.gov/search/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIk9_l89TP9AIVxx-tBh0U0wZAEAAYAiAAEgL5XfD_BwE to see if there are other vaccination sites with available appointments.
If I receive my first vaccine dose at Priority Medical Group (PMG), am I guaranteed an appointment for my second dose?
Second doses are scheduled on-site after the first dose is administered. If you have received a first dose at Stanford and did not schedule a second dose, please call 520-689-6814 to schedule a second dose appointment at Priority Medical Group (PMG).

Second doses are scheduled on-site after the first dose is administered.

We recommend that you receive your second vaccine dose at the same facility where you received the first dose. If this is not possible, second doses will be accommodated at Priority Medical Group (PMG) with proof of vaccine record, even if the first dose was received at a different facility. Please call 520-689-6814 to schedule a second dose appointment at Priority Medical Group (PMG).

No; it is not necessary to get an antibody test after you are fully vaccinated (two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine or one dose of the Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) vaccine). The vaccine stimulates the immune system in many ways, only one of which is to produce the IgG antibodies we test for when looking for evidence of protection. Also, the COVID-19 antibody tests currently available under the FDA’s Emergency Use Authorization have variable sensitivity and specificity and are not authorized for the assessment of immune response in vaccinated people. In fact, it is possible to be effectively immunized despite a negative post-vaccination antibody test; it is also unknown what level of antibodies might ensure protection. For these reasons, and in accordance with CDC guidelines, we do not recommend routine antibody testing after receiving the vaccine. In certain high-risk immunosuppressed populations, physicians may recommend such testing.

Children aged 5-11 will receive a smaller dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, using smaller needles. The dose for these children is 10 micrograms, one-third of that used in teens and adults. Children’s immune systems are more responsive than those of adults and in clinical trials, the smaller dose was found to produce a robust immune response.
Children will receive two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine spaced three weeks apart, the same timing as for older age groups.
Vaccine trials for children younger than 5, using even smaller doses, are ongoing. Pfizer representatives have said they expect to report results for the youngest children before the end of this year. The Food and Drug Administration and the CDC will then consider the results, with possible authorization for young children in early 2022.
For more information on the pediatric COVID-19 vaccine, read our Pediatric Vaccine FAQs.

Priority Medical Group ( PMG) follows guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on all COVID-19 vaccine administration. At this time, the CDC recommends that people whose immune systems are moderately to severely compromised should receive a third dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, only after 28 days or more following their second dose. Priority Medical Group ( PMG) is now scheduling appointments for our established patients who meet this criteria.
How do I make sure my vaccine records are available to my primary care physician/doctors?
If you are a Priority Medical Group ( PMG) patient, your medical record will be updated in PMG patient portal. You can also access your vaccination records from our medical records department at 520-689-6814. If you are not a Priority Medical Group (PMG) patient, please share your vaccination card with your doctor or nurse.

If you book an appointment with another provider and have an existing appointment at Priority Medical Group (PMG), please cancel your existing appointment. This will help open our schedule and allow other people to book new appointments to be vaccinated.

Please visit the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) website  for more information and resources about the COVID-19 vaccine. The website is hosted in multiple languages.

If you received a message to reschedule your vaccination appointment, please go to your PMG patient Portal account or call at 520-689-6814 to reschedule your appointment.

Please bring a form of identification to your vaccination.

We are not able to provide replacements for lost vaccine cards. You can get a copy of the record if you got the vaccine at a site run by Priority Medical Group (PMG). To get a copy:
Call the medical records office at Priority Medical Group (PMG) at 520-689-6814
OR
If you have a PMG Patient Portal, you can log in to a computer and print out your record. It won’t print from the PMG Patient Portal, you on a smartphone, unfortunately.

PMG Patient Portal, is your online account connected to AdvancedMD. To get the record of your COVID-19 vaccination:
• Log in to PMG Patient Portal, you with your username and password on a laptop or desktop.
• Click on “My Medical Record” and “Immunizations.”
• Look for the printer icon and click it. Print out the information.

COVID-19 Vaccine For Kids Aged 5-11 FAQs

COVID-19 vaccines for kids aged 5-11 are now being scheduled.

On Nov. 2, the Centers for Disease Control recommended that COVID-19 vaccinations be given to children as young as 5. Pediatricians’ offices, pharmacies and health systems are preparing to offer the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines to children across the country. According to Drs, Maldonado and Lee from Stanford University the following is an update on pediatric considerations for the COVID 19 Vaccinations for kids age 5 to 11.

Children need the protection offered by vaccination. More than 6 million children in the United States have been infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus since the beginning of the pandemic. Some have become severely ill and even died from complications of COVID-19.
In addition to its direct effects on their health, the pandemic has disrupted children’s education, friendships and relationships with extended family. Vaccines will make it safer for kids to take part in many activities that are important to their well-being and growth, including attending school and spending time with loved ones.
Children are a large segment of the population. Vaccinating them will help control the virus and help prevent the development of new viral variants.

Children aged 5-11 will receive a smaller dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, using smaller needles. The dose for these children is 10 micrograms, one-third of that used in teens and adults. Children’s immune systems are more responsive than those of adults and in clinical trials, the smaller dose was found to produce a robust immune response.
Children will receive two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine spaced three weeks apart, the same timing as for older age groups.
Vaccine trials for children younger than 5, using even smaller doses, are ongoing. Pfizer representatives have said they expect to report results for the youngest children before the end of this year. The Food and Drug Administration and the CDC will then consider the results, with possible authorization for young children in early 2022.

The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was studied in a clinical trial of more than 2,200 children aged 5 to 11, including about 150 children at Stanford. The trial followed the same process as clinical trials used for all other childhood vaccines.
In the trial, COVID-19 vaccination produced a similar immune response to that seen in clinical trials in adults. The vaccine was 90.7% effective in preventing symptomatic COVID-19 infection in children.
Children in the trial had only mild to moderate side effects that resolved in a few days. The side effects included redness and swelling, fatigue, headache, muscle and/or joint pain, chills, fever, swollen lymph nodes, nausea and decreased appetite. These side effects are consistent with the body’s normal reactions to vaccination and indicate that the immune system is doing its job. Side effects in the heart, which have been observed in some adolescent boys who received the vaccine, were not seen in children younger than 12.
The side effects of vaccination are much less severe than the range of symptoms with COVID-19 infection. Although most children with COVID-19 have mild illness, thousands across the country have been hospitalized, and hundreds have died. Getting vaccinated is much safer than getting sick with COVID-19.
Clinical trials in children of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine are underway.
On Nov. 2, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) unanimously recommended the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for kids 5 to 11 years of age. Dr. Grace Lee, associate chief medical officer for practice innovation and infectious diseases physician at Stanford Children’s Health, and ACIP Chair, discusses the recommendation.

Pediatricians’ practices across the country have been planning for several weeks to make vaccines quickly available. Contact your child’s pediatrician for an appointment.
Parents can also schedule their child for a vaccine appointment through Stanford Children’s Health at FINDCOVID19AZ or check for appointments in their community through the California Department of Public Health at FINDCOVID19AZ
If your child has not yet received a flu shot this year, the COVID-19 vaccine can be given at the same time as any other childhood vaccine, including the flu vaccine. Flu vaccination is recommended for everyone older than 6 months of age.

While the vaccinations are very effective, especially for preventing severe COVID-19, they do not provide perfect protection.
Until the pandemic is broadly controlled, we need to use all available tools to reduce viral spread in schools and other public settings, including vaccinating everyone who is eligible to receive the vaccine, mask-wearing indoors for everyone older than 2 and in some cases outdoors as well, hand hygiene, physical distancing, improving ventilation in schools when possible, and other mitigation measures.
Reducing viral spread keeps our communities healthy and gives the virus fewer opportunities to mutate in ways that result in dangerous new variants.

COVID-19 Booster Shot FAQs

“Third doses” are different than a “booster dose.” A booster is an added dose of a vaccine that is given to someone with a healthy immune system who built enough protection after being fully vaccinated. If that protection gradually decreases, a booster can help sustain it. Third doses are provided to individuals with compromised immune systems for whom the original vaccine dose was not sufficient to achieve protection from the virus.

Booster shots are recommended to certain groups of people based on their age, health condition or occupation as approved by both the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA).

This includes people who received their 2nd dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine at least 6 months ago and meet one of the following criteria:

If you received the first dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine at least 2 months ago and are at least 18 years old, you can receive any type of booster. Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech booster doses may be mixed and matched.

If you are under age 50 and immunocompromised, it is recommended that you receive a third dose of the vaccine. If you are under 50 and meet the CDC’s criteria for a booster dose, you can schedule to receive a booster dose through MyHealth. If you have questions about whether you should receive a booster dose, please discuss your personal health situation with your primary health care physician.

Yes, the COVID-19 vaccine and flu vaccine may be given at the same time.

Booster doses can be given after waiting at least six months from the date the second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine was received. If you received a Johnson & Johnson vaccine, a booster dose can be given two months after the first dose.

Who Should Get The COVID-19 Vaccine And Factors To Consider

Because of reports of anaphylactic reactions in persons who received the COVID-19 vaccine outside of clinical trials, the CDC has proposed the following guidance:

  • Persons who have had a severe allergic reaction to any vaccine or injectable therapy (intramuscular, intravenous, or subcutaneous) should not receive the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine at this time.
  • Persons who have had a severe allergic reaction to any ingredient in a COVID-19 vaccine should not get that specific vaccine.
  • Vaccine providers should observe patients after vaccination to monitor for the occurrence of immediate adverse reactions:
    • Persons with a history of anaphylaxis: 30 minutes
    • All other persons: 15 minutes
  • This recommendation does not apply to persons with other severe allergic reactions (for example: food allergies).

Stanford Medicine recommends that persons with a history of anaphylaxis or severe allergic reactions discuss COVID-19 vaccination with their primary care physician.  The CDC Interim Considerations document details more considerations.

As per CDC guidelines, COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for all people 12 years and older, including people who are pregnant, breastfeeding, trying to get pregnant now, or might become pregnant in the future.

Evidence about the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy has been growing. These data suggest that the benefits of receiving a COVID-19 vaccine outweigh any known or potential risks of vaccination during pregnancy.

There is currently no evidence that any vaccines, including COVID-19 vaccines, cause fertility problems in women or men.

Pregnant and recently pregnant people are more likely to get severely ill with COVID-19 compared with non-pregnant people. Source: CDC

Stanford Medicine recommends that people who are pregnant or lactating discuss COVID-19 vaccination with their primary care physician if they are uncertain regarding vaccination.

Yes. There is strong evidence that vaccination-induced immunity is significantly more protective than natural immunity. As the Delta variant continues to drive higher infection and death among the unvaccinated, vaccination is strongly recommended to ensure the safety of our community.

People with COVID-19 who have symptoms should wait to be vaccinated until they have recovered from their illness and have met the criteria for discontinuing isolation.

People who have tested positive for COVID-19 without symptoms should also wait until they meet the criteria for discontinuing isolation before getting vaccinated.

People who were treated for COVID-19 with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, or who were diagnosed with multi-system inflammatory syndrome, should typically wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccine. (Source: CDC).

Priority Medical Group recommends that persons who have had COVID-19 in the last 90 days discuss COVID-19 vaccination with their primary care physician if they are uncertain regarding vaccination.

Individuals who develop COVID-19 after the first dose may receive their vaccine after their symptoms resolve and they have met criteria to discontinue isolation per CDC guidelines or they may choose to defer their second dose up to six weeks (42 days) after their first dose without having to repeat the full two-dose sequence. (Source: CDC).

About The COVID-19 Vaccine

Priority Medical Group offers the three vaccines currently approved for use in the United States: Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.

Vaccine type is based on availability at each vaccine clinic site. In most cases, you will not be able to choose which type of vaccine you receive. However, if you have been advised to receive one vaccine type over another based on your circumstances or health history, please alert the clinic staff upon your arrival and we will do our best to accommodate your request or refer you to another site.

Vaccines work by teaching our immune systems to fight against infections.  The Pfizer and Moderna vaccine uses an mRNA strategy to teach your body to target the surface of the virus.  The Janssen vaccine teaches the immune system to attack the protein the virus uses.  Both have shown to help your body protect against COVID-19.

The three vaccines being offered are all highly effective at protecting against severe forms of COVID-19 that can result in hospitalization or death.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that mRNA vaccines are being held to the same rigorous safety and effectiveness standards as all other types of vaccines in the United States. The only COVID-19 vaccines the Food and Drug Administration will make available for use in the United States are those that meet these standards.

These vaccines have demonstrated equivalent vaccine efficacy across all racial and ethnic backgrounds. This will continue to be tracked over the next two years.

Stanford Medicine is encouraged by the high level of racial and ethnic diversity represented in the Pfizer and Moderna clinical trials. Pfizer has stated that approximately 42% of its 44,392 participants in its global COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials have a diverse background. Moderna has reported that it recruited more than 11,000 people from communities of color — 37% of its cohort — as well as 7,000 people over the age of 65. The Moderna vaccine had 100% efficacy in those aged 65 and older, and 100% efficacy in communities of color.

Learn more about clinical trials at the US Food & Drug Administration website.

There is evidence that the three vaccines currently in use in the U.S. (Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen) are likely to be effective against the major COVID-19 variants.

Please remember that vaccines are just one of several tools to help end the pandemic. It is essential for everyone, including those who have been vaccinated, to continue using all the tools available to help stop the spread of infection, including covering mouth and nose with a mask, washing hands often, staying at least 6 feet away from others, testing when indicated, and following all guidance from state and county health officials.

There is evidence that the three vaccines currently in use in the U.S. (Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen) are likely to be effective against the major COVID-19 variants.

Please remember that vaccines are just one of several tools to help end the pandemic. It is essential for everyone, including those who have been vaccinated, to continue using all the tools available to help stop the spread of infection, including covering mouth and nose with a mask, washing hands often, staying at least 6 feet away from others, testing when indicated, and following all guidance from state and county health officials.

There is some evidence that one dose of two-dose vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna) can provide some protection against COVID-19 and is therefore better than not getting vaccinated at all. However, two doses of two-dose vaccines, given at the proper intervals, is still the U.S. recommendation. At this time, the CDC is also recommending a third shot for individuals with weak immune systems. Stanford Health Care will continue to follow CDC guidance for populations who may receive the booster dose. Please continue to check this website for updates.

Please remember that vaccines are just one of several tools to help end the pandemic. It is essential for everyone, including those who have been vaccinated, to continue using all the tools available to help stop the spread of infection, including covering mouth and nose with a mask, washing hands often, staying at least 6 feet away from others, testing when indicated, and following all guidance from state and county health officials.

Side Effects Of The COVID-19 Vaccine

As with any vaccine, people can react differently. It’s important to know that even rare, severe side effects will be temporary and should not dissuade vaccine recipients from completing their course of injections.

Many people who receive vaccines will have no side effects. Some will have mild side effects, which may include:

  • Low-grade fever
  • Chills
  • Soreness at the injection site
  • Headache
  • Slight fatigue

In rare cases, people may experience more serious side effects, which are defined as side effects that prevent daily activities. These uncommon, temporary but severe side effects may include:

  • Immediate allergic reaction
  • High fever
  • Muscle pain
  • Joint pain
  • Nausea

Anyone who reacts to a COVID-19 vaccine should have either an allergy consultation or referral to consider a second dose. Even if you have side effects, it is still important to get a second dose.

There is no chance the vaccine will cause COVID-19.

If you had a first-dose reaction, you might still be able to get a second dose. Among people who had a possible allergic reaction to a first dose of COVID-19 vaccine, most of those who received a second dose have tolerated the second dose well.

Early in the vaccine rollout, there was a concern that people with polyethylene glycol (PEG) allergy might react to the COVID-19 mRNA vaccines. More recent data shows that many people who have reacted to other PEG-containing medications have not reacted to the mRNA vaccines.

So far, most side effects have been mild and temporary. Historically, the vast majority of complications in vaccines appear within 60 days of injection.

It has been over a year since clinical trials began for the COVID-19 vaccines, and there have been no new concerns about long term effects.

Safety Precautions

Yes. Vaccines are just one of several tools to help end the pandemic. COVID-19 vaccines are highly likely to prevent people from becoming ill due to COVID-19. However, additional research over the next several months is needed to show:

  • Whether the COVID-19 vaccine, in addition to preventing illness, also prevents infection from the virus
  • Whether a person who has been vaccinated can spread the virus

For this reason, it is essential for everyone, including those who have been vaccinated, to continue using all the tools available to help stop the spread of infection, including covering mouth and nose with a mask, washing hands often, staying at least 6 feet away from others, testing when indicated, and following all guidance from state and county health officials.

Yes. Vaccines are just one of several tools to help end the pandemic. COVID-19 vaccines are highly likely to prevent people from becoming ill due to COVID-19. However, additional research over the next several months is needed to show:

  • Whether the COVID-19 vaccine, in addition to preventing illness, also prevents infection from the virus
  • Whether a person who has been vaccinated can spread the virus

For this reason, it is essential for everyone, including those who have been vaccinated, to continue using all the tools available to help stop the spread of infection, including covering mouth and nose with a mask, washing hands often, staying at least 6 feet away from others, testing when indicated, and following all guidance from state and county health officials.

Individuals are considered fully vaccinated:

  • 2 weeks after their second dose in a 2-dose series, like the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or
  • 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine, like Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine

If it has been less than 2 weeks since your shot, or if you still need to get your second dose, you are NOT fully protected. Once you’re fully vaccinated, it’s important that you continue to take precautions and follow public health guidance. Visit the CDC for guidance for fully vaccinated people.

Billing and Insurance

The COVID-19 vaccine will be provided with no out-of-pocket cost to patients.

The actual vaccination purchased and distributed by government agencies is free of charge. However, there is a cost to administer the vaccination. This cost will be billed and paid by your insurance or government program. There’s no out-of-pocket cost to you to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

Medicare and Medi-Cal have provided guidance that the vaccine administration should be billed directly to the government program instead of the HMO to simplify the administration and tracking. We require the correct member ID number to properly bill/report to the government program. There’s no out-of-pocket cost to you to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

Vaccination Outside of the United States

If you have completed a series of a World Health Organization (WHO) approved vaccine, you should not start a new series in the U.S. The CDC states that only people who have received all recommended doses of an FDA-approved, FDA-authorized, or WHO-listed COVID-19 vaccine are considered fully vaccinated for the purpose of public health guidance.

If you received vaccines not currently approved by the WHO or CDC, talk with your primary care provider about how to proceed with vaccination in the US.

If you have completed only part of the series of a WHO approved vaccine, please seek guidance from your primary care physician and, if appropriate, start a new series of any U.S. approved vaccine. If your doctor advises you to schedule a new vaccine series, you can schedule at Priority Medical Group  by stating that you are receiving a first vaccine dose.

If you completed part of or all of a series of a vaccine not approved by WHO, please seek guidance from your primary care physician, and, if appropriate, start a new series of any U.S. approved vaccine. If your doctor advises you to schedule a new vaccine series, you can schedule at Priority Medical Group by stating that you are receiving a first vaccine dose.

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